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mfearing:

A nice mention of The Thing with No Head available on iBooks.

Originally posted on This Kid Reviews Books:

Today I give you very different (but yet awesome in their own way) illustrated books!

lowriders

Lowriders in Space
By Cathy Camper
Illustrated by Raul the Third
112 pages – ages 8+
Published by Chronicle Books on November 4, 2014

Synopsis- All Lupe Impala, El Chavo Flapjack, and Elirio Malaria want is a car garage of their own, to run their own business. They especially like working on and creating “lowriders,” a funky type of car that hip-hops down the road. When they see a car show that offers an amazing prize – a carload of cash! – they start to design a car that is out of this world. Will they win the prize and get their dream of owning their own garage?

What I Thought- Okay, I will admit I was not the least bit interested in this book when it came to me as a review copy. I…

View original 393 more words

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Gift giving has started and for all those lucky new iPad owners – you really need new books. And – hey! What about books only available on the iPad! Like The Thing with No Head and The Boy Who Was Swallowed By A Tiger!?

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If you are looking for something a little different, give them a try. Basically these are 28 page illustrated books (yeah they don’t fit easily into a genre of publishing) that aren’t exactly conventional narratives.

The Thing with No Head is a story about finding a best friend who may not always be the easiest friend to like, but perhaps helps you see things from a new perspective.

And The Boy Who Was Swallowed By A Tiger is a surreal story of surviving difficulties. And how sometimes positive things develop from unfortunate circumstances.

Go forth and spend $1.99. That’s less than half a small popcorn at at movie. The best deal for your entertainment dollar!

 

Morning Victories!

morning

The day starts off great when I get up early enough to get dressed and let the dog out before I have to begin the process of waking my daughter. Then I have to negotiate enquiring if her hair is brushed and her face is washed without her getting made at me (Dad! I said I’ll do it!).

If I also get the dog fed and medicated (she’s old – it’s two medicines a morning now) before my daughter comes downtsairs I start to feel invincible! And if I make my daughter a good breakfast (instead of just a slice of apple as we run for the bus) that she likes – that feels like a gold medal performance. If I also manage to boil water and have at least a sip of tea BEFORE we rain-coat up for the walk to the bus stop – well, now I’m just on fire.

The final trick is the most difficult- leashing the dog up, so her walk starts on our way to the bus stop. If we’re late, back to the car for the drive to school, the  dog back in the house until after I get back. Not good. Morning routine extended for another 20 or 30 minutes. But if it all works – I’m at my desk by 8:45 feeling like there is no morning routine I can’t handle.

Now, what am I supposed to do today?

And for you folks with 2 or 3 kids – I don’t know how you do it!

Loitering on the Internet

Loitering is sometimes and in some places considered a crime. But it’s what the web was built for.  Loitering online is now a national pastime.

I start my day loitering online and end far too many by closing the cover on my iPad.

It makes being a coach potato seem an old-timey, quaint pastime from yesteryear – this 24-7 mobile-enhanced street corner I spend my time on.

I try and tell myself how useful it all is. But I have my doubts. Maybe there always was something to loitering – something forbidden, sometimes by law, but something soothing in its passiveness.

And now it’s one big global digital street corner where the conversation had only changed a little. “What you doing tonight?”. “Check out this hairdo!”. “Did you see those cats! I mean really, check out this cat – he plays the keyboard!” “I made 3,000 new friends today.”

 

 

Sure turkey time is past and I gotta stop talking about my Thanksgiving book, but hey, here’s a great review of The Great Thanksgiving Escape from The Las Vegas Review Journal by Terri Schlichenmeyer.

“Yes, this is a kids’ book, but I absolutely loved the imaginations and the naughty glee that author-illustrator Mark Fearing gives his main characters; there’s so much mischief in every word and picture of this book that I lingered on the pages, just because I liked the rowdiness it implied. Is there an adult who won’t remember that with fondness? I don’t think so, and I don’t think there’s a kid who won’t find it hilarious.”

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And here is one from the Citizen-Times written by Jennifer Prince.

“Fearing’s drawings are enhanced digitally, enriching the color saturation and shading throughout the book. Fearing’s drawing style is a cross between Charles Addams, the artist who created the Addams Family cartoons, and David Shannon, the author and illustrator of the “David” picture books. The mix of mild eeriness and cheeky joie de vivre is unique to Fearing, and complements the satirical humor of the story perfectly.

“The Great Thanksgiving Escape” is a delightful story to read-aloud this holiday. Most likely, the book will become a perennial favorite.”

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And it’s always a thrill to be called out in my home state. The Great Thanksgiving Escape made an appearance in this list of wintry kids books from the Minneapolis Star Tribune by L.K Hanson.

“This mission includes the dangerous negotiating of “The Hall of Aunts” and “The Great Wall of Butts.” Fearing’s work has an appealing edginess that resonates with kids, and he’s a careful observer of telling detail, which adds to the enjoyment.”

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And now I promise – I’m done tooting the Thanksgiving book horn.

But in this day and age and given the media saturation we live in, reading that ones work has resonated somewhere, even for a short time, is not only gratifying, it provides the energy to keep at it. It helps me sit in my chair for long hours and difficult revisions. It helps create a bit of a calm so I can settle into what is otherwise a rather lonely, isolating job. It’s like getting an answer to ones frenetic screaming.

And you know, you can read the book all year long…I’m just saying…

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It’s a little past Thanksgiving but The Great Thanksgiving Escape received a call-out in the Horn Book as a Holiday High Note!

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Man, there’s a lot of wonderful books on this list. It’s a real honor to be included. Remember, there’s another Thanksgiving in a year! And the book will keep just fine until then!

Have a GOTHIC Holiday!

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Both my ebooks are now available. Are they a little odd? A little weird? A little, little? Yes. They are about 25 pages and are only available on Apple’s iBookstore. This stories are what happens in-between my ‘real’ projects. Something to run with and they sort of do what they want. For $1.99 you can’t go wrong!

I have written about 10 of these short tales that tend to the darker side, but always with a smile. Think Tim Burton meets Edward Gorey meets Charles Schulz. You can download a sample of each on the iBookstore.

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